10 Things to Include on Your Acting Resume

acting resumeWhen it comes to preparing your acting resume, knowing what to include can be a challenge. However, there are several items that should always be included. Instead of only listing the parts you’ve played, include some of the following items to dazzle directors:

 

 

  1. Up-to-date Contact Information – One of the most important parts of any resume is your contact information. How will recruiters and talent agents contact you if your information is not correct? Update your contact information whenever it changes. Include a working phone number and an email address. Make sure your email address sounds professional, and also be sure to note which contact method is best to reach you.

  2. Physical Attributes – Since acting is as much about visual appearance as it is talent, include your physical description on your resume. Your height, hair and eye color, and weight should appear somewhere on your resume. It is best to include this information at the top of your resume. Like your contact information, your appearance information must be updated periodically to reflect any physical changes.

  3. Memberships – If you belong to any acting organizations or unions, they should also be included on your acting resume. This shows that you are serious about your career and that you have a network that could possibly vouch for you if needed. And if you belong to an organization that a recruiter or agent is also a member of, you already have a connection that can help during your audition.

  4. Past Experience – No matter what role or part you are auditioning for, you must include your past acting experience. You should indicate whether the parts were for theater productions, movie roles, or television appearances. If your acting history is small, include what you can – and never lie on your resume.

  5. Education – If you have little acting experience but have been studying to be an actor at a formal university, this section gives agents a point of reference. You should only include formal education and classes that relate directly to acting, as opposed to listing your education in full.

  6. Training – Your acting resume should also include any training courses you have taken. This is different from formal education, as you may have studied another subject during college. Include the names of your trainers or studios, as well as what exactly was taught. Avoid being vague here – include acting techniques in as much detail as possible. Also include training related to other fields, such as singing, playing musical instruments, or public speaking.

  7. Primary Acting Skills – There are several skills involved with acting, including voice skills and combat skills. List the ones you are proficient in, as well as some detail about each. You can also include skills not related to acting, such as credentials that could come in handy. Again, don’t lie about what skills you have on your resume.

  8. Know Your Type – Many actors fear being typecast as their career progresses. But this can be a valuable way to advance your career if you are just starting out. Know which roles you are adept at playing. Instead of accepting any part you can, consider informing agents and recruiters about which roles you are the best fit for during auditions.

  9. Know Your Role Types – When preparing your acting resume, you should include whether or not you can fill speaking or non-speaking roles. Indicate if you are best fit for leading roles, supporting roles, or voice-over parts. If you’re a non-speaker, list if you’re a body or stunt double or an extra. You can also list any other industry roles, such as print ads or commercials, all of which can be important.

  10. Your Headshot – Most acting resumes can be printed on the back of a headshot and cut to size. Just as listing your physical description helps agents and directors find a good place for your appearance, your headshot gives them a picture they can really see. You should update your headshot every time your appearance changes. When you arrive at your audition you should look like your headshot does.

Preparing an acting resume might seem like a lot of work, but taking the time to do it right will build the foundation of a strong acting career. Good luck!

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- Preparing For Your First Acting Audition
- Insider Advice from a Glee Warbler and Industry Pro
- Nail Your Audition for X Factor and More

 

Photo by nickgregan

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